The Historic Day isn't all Shamrocks, Leprechauns and Pots of Gold

“Kiss me, I’m Irish!” is written across hundreds of t-shirts in a sea full of green at St. Patrick’s Day parades and festivals around the globe. Everyone claims a bit of the Irish heritage on this day to rightfully participate in green beer drinking contests, three-leaf clover scouting and seeing if the luck of the Irish is truly on their side in pursuit to catch a leprechaun. St. Patrick’s Day became an official public holiday in 1903 only in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Newfoundland, Labrador and Montserrat. The 17th day of March commemorates the death of Saint Patrick, a beloved patron saint of Ireland who brought Christianity to the country during the latter half of the fifth century. Read on to learn more about this Irish holiday and don’t forget to bring in your green and shamrock printed clothes to Clean Wave Laundry once the holiday is over!

Power of the Shamrock
Legend has it the shamrock, a.k.a. three-leaf clover, was used by Saint Patrick to explain the Holy Trinity to the people of Ireland. It is a perfect symbolic tool found naturally around the country’s rolling hills. Saint Patrick established many Catholic churches, monasteries and schools in his country with the help of the shamrock (or luck, we should say) and the three-leaf clover has risen to popularity around the world! 

Saint Patrick Didn’t Like the Color Green
That’s right, he actually preferred the color blue! Saint Patrick’s blue is a name given to several shades of blue used in old Irish flags created during his time. The blue shade was adopted as the official color of the “Order of St. Patrick” in the 1780s. The color green came into play during the Irish Rebellion in 1798 when wearing a clover and green became a symbol of nationalism. The trend stuck ever since!

The Classic “Irish” Dish of Corned Beef and Cabbage isn’t so Irish
Who doesn’t love delicious corned beef and cabbage? The people of Ireland don’t! Corned beef and cabbage was apparently invented in New York City by who others assumed were immigrants of Ireland but no one knows for sure. The meal is cooked in American homes across the nation on St. Patty’s day with an ode to the “Irish” in mind. A whopping 26 billion pounds of beef and a massive two billion pounds of cabbage are produced in the U.S. during this time. Wow!

Cheers to Guinness
Something that is in fact Irish is Guinness beer, a rich, dry stout brewed at the St. James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin, Ireland. Since the Irish have good taste, people worldwide love to drink this divine beer causing the consumption of Guinness to nearly triple from its regular 5.5 million pints per day consumption rate to 13 million pints during the St. Patrick’s day season. Cheers to you, Ireland! 

Saint Patrick Saved Ireland from the Wrath of Evil Snakes
While Saint Patrick wasn’t teaching the people of Ireland the Christian faith, he helped rid the country of dreaded snakes in his free time. The ancient story goes Saint Patrick rid the country of these sinister pests after he was attacked during his 40-day fast. He banished all snakes to the sea and since then they have never dared come back! But truth be told, there have never been any snakes present on the island of Ireland to begin with according to modern-day naturalist history and records. "At no time has there ever been any suggestion of snakes in Ireland, so there was nothing for Saint Patrick to banish", says naturalist Nigel Monaghan, keeper of natural history at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin. But let’s stick to the story of Saint Patrick banning them, it’s more fun. 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day, Clean Wave® customers! 

Clean Wave® Laundry is your friendly, upscale 24-hour Fort Lauderdale laundry serving Broward and Miami-Dade counties including the neighborhoods of Pompano Beach, Plantation, Davie, Dania Beach, Sunrise, Hollywood, Pembroke Pines, Boca Raton and Miami.

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Clean Wave®Laundry is located at 3101 Davie Blvd. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312

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